Increase In Discrimination Complaints Linked To Poor Economy | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Increase In Discrimination Complaints Linked To Poor Economy

Play associated audio

By Kavitha Cardoza

Discrimination complaints in D.C. have increased by 70 percent in the past two years. The director of the Office of Human Rights says this upward trend is linked to the poor economy.

Gustavo Velasquez heads the Office of Human Rights in the District. He says during the last fiscal year, there were 585 discrimination complaints filed.

"This is the year we've had the highest volume of cases in the last 15 years," says Velasquez.

Velasquez believes the economy is the main reason- because business have been hiring less, laying off more people and feeling reluctant to promote employees.

"That creates an effect where many people believe that the reasons why is because of who they are and not what the companies claim which is deteriorating revenue," he says.

Velasquez says the fourth most common reason for filing an employment discrimination complaint relates to age. He says a few years ago that wouldn't even have made the top ten. Velasquez says typically approximately five percent of the complaints are found to be substantive.

NPR

Meet The 2014 Winners Of The MacArthur 'Genius Grants'

This year's winners include a cartoonist, a documentarian, a leader in the legal fight for gay marriage, a saxophonist, mathematicians and scientists, poets, lawyers and advocates.
NPR

Edible Packaging? Retailers Not Quite Ready To Ditch The Wrapper

To reduce waste, some enterprising companies are trying to roll out products that make the package part of the snack — edible packaging. But selling it to the retail market is trickier than it seems.
WAMU 88.5

Senator's Legislation Would Strip NFL Of Nonprofit Status

The Redskins' refusal to change its name has prompted the legislation from U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-WA).
NPR

The Kaypro II: An Early Computer With A Writer's Heart

Commentator Andrei Codrescu remembers the first word processor he had — the Kaypro II in the 1980s. Its inventor, Andrew Kay, died Aug. 28, at the age of 95.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.