: News

Legendary Gay Rights Activist Applauds D.C.

Play associated audio

By Rebecca Sheir

A historic figure in the gay rights movement is applauding Washington's first same-sex marriages. But Dr. Frank Kameny says there's still work to be done.

In 1957, long before "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," Frank Kameny was fired from his position as an Army Map Service astronomer because he was gay.

Four years later, Kameny co-founded the Mattachine Society of Washington, one of the earliest LGBT advocacy groups in the U.S.

Kameny spoke at a news conference after some of D.C.'s first same-sex weddings were held.

"This represents a major victory," he said, "One that has been in the making for 35 to 40 years, although back then we never remotely thought it would really come to pass," says Kameny.

Kameny says other victories are in the making, but they'll require a lot of work. And as a man who helped overturn the American Psychiatric Association's definition of homosexuality as a mental illness, and who pressed the federal government to stop refusing security clearances to homosexuals, Kameny knows it's difficult, but not impossible to get the work done.

NPR

Pack These Pages: Three Must-Reads For Summer

Harriet Logan, owner of Loganberry Books in Shaker Heights, Ohio, recommends a graphic novel about trash, a George Eliot classic and a children's book about a bear pianist.
NPR

Why Does Every New Restaurant Look Like A Factory?

The stripped-down look of exposed brick, poured cement floors, and Edison light bulbs is popular in restaurants across America. One reporter dares to ask, "Seriously, why?"
NPR

Obama: Globalization Is 'Here' And 'Done'

Warning against withdrawing from trade deals, the president acknowledged a legitimate gripe with globalization, but says focusing only on local markets is the wrong medicine.
NPR

Facebook Shakes Up News Feed, But We Still Don't Know Exactly How It Works

It will now prioritize posts from friends and family — potentially bad news for media companies relying on Facebook for traffic. The company has been under pressure to defend its political neutrality.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.