Are Fire Retardants Putting Us At Risk? (Part 2) | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Are Fire Retardants Putting Us At Risk? (Part 2)

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Fire retardant chemicals can be found in an array of household items, and the federal government doesn't require companies to reveal which chemicals are in their products.
Photo CC-licensed to Back_garage on Flickr
Fire retardant chemicals can be found in an array of household items, and the federal government doesn't require companies to reveal which chemicals are in their products.

From The Environment Report:

Producer: Rebecca Williams

You have flame retardant chemicals in your body. They’re toxic. Americans have the highest levels of anyone in the world. The chemicals are in the dust in our homes and offices and schools. And they’re showing up in our food. In the second of our five part series... Rebecca Williams takes a look at what these exposures might mean for our health...

EPA site on PBDEs

More about PBDEs and breast milk

Read the statements from industry groups and the EPA

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