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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, March 8, 2010

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(March 16) SUPREMELY ENTERTAINING There is no mocking the trial taking place at the Shakespeare Theatre next week, as U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg presides over Judgment at Agincourtin downtown D.C. next Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. High-power D.C. lawyers let the legal sparks fly, as Shakespeare's Henry the Fifth faces judgment for his wartime actions against the French.

(March 8) SPRING SIZZLE There's a party with the seasons in mind, as EDGEWORKS Dance Theater celebrates Spring Sizzle tonight in downtown D.C. in the Knoll Showroom at 6:30 p.m. Live reggae by the band Proverbs provides cool sounds to warm up the night during EDGEWORKS' annual benefit to raise money for arts and community programs.

(March 11) SOLAR POWER Solar enthusiast Richard King directs our attention skyward as he hosts a lecture on lessons learned during this year's Solar Decathlon at the National Building Museum Thursday at 12:30 p.m., exploring the latest in sunshine-powered homes.

WAMU 88.5

Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.

NPR

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries — with culturally specific adaptations. The U.S., for instance, gets shorter noodles, because Americans don't slurp them up like the Japanese.
WAMU 88.5

Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

NPR

Scientists To Bid A Bittersweet Farewell To Rosetta, The Comet Chaser

To cap its 12-year scientific voyage, the Rosetta spacecraft will take a final plunge Friday. Scientists will signal Rosetta to crash into the surface of a comet — and gather data all the way down.

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