VA Senate Democrats Kill Slew Of Pro-Gun Proposals | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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VA Senate Democrats Kill Slew Of Pro-Gun Proposals

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By Jonathan Wilson

In Virginia, a Senate subcommittee created to block pro-gun legislation has shot down numerous proposals to loosen the state's gun laws.

The special subcommittee of the Senate Courts of Justice Committee on Thursday rejected 10 bills, including measures to exempt firearms made or sold in the state from federal law and shield concealed handgun permit holders' information from the public.

Also tabled was a bill crafted by Republican delegate Scott Lingamfelter, of Prince William County, which would have repealed the states 17-year-old ban on buying more than one handgun a month.

Republicans and gun rights advocates cried foul when the subcommittee was created earlier in the week and given the authority to kill bills without a vote of the full committee.

It was Democrats' only hope of killing some of the measures because even though they have the majority on the full committee, several party members regularly vote with Republicans to approve pro-gun bills.

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