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Shooting Closes Pentagon Station

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Undated FBI photo of John Patrick Bedell, the gunman who was killed in a shootout with police officers at the Pentagon Metro station.
NBC4.com
Undated FBI photo of John Patrick Bedell, the gunman who was killed in a shootout with police officers at the Pentagon Metro station.

By Rebecca Sheir

The Pentagon Metro stop is closed because of an ongoing investigation involving a gunman who police say shot two officers. The closure is affecting the commute of thousands of residents in the area.

Metro is providing additional buses at Pentagon City to take passengers to South Hayes Street, just outside the Pentagon. But many commuters at the bus bay in Pentagon City worry about getting to work on time.

One woman lives near U Street in Northwest D.C., and works in Skyline, so she usually takes a bus from the Pentagon to her office. When asked how she plans on getting to work, she says, "I'm gonna see if the shuttle comes! And then if not, the cabs are like $15, which is pretty annoying."

Several commuters say they're surprised the Pentagon station remains closed after last night's incident. Richard Keevill, chief of Pentagon Police, says a significant number of shots were fired, so investigators need more time to explore the crime scene.

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