: News

"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, March 4, 2010

Play associated audio

(March 5-12) THE BLUEST EYE University of Maryland's theater department tackles Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center in College Park, Maryland, opening tomorrow and running through March 12th. The play centers on an 11-year-old African-American girl growing up in 1940s Ohio, who blames her dark skin for the discrimination she faces and prays for a pair of blue eyes. Next Tuesday's performance includes a "talk back" session with UM faculty from the English and history departments.

(March 5-28) LAUREL ART GUILD The 41st Annual Laurel Art Guild features the work of Maryland, Northern Virginia and D.C. artists, with an exhibit that opens tomorrow and runs through March 28th. You can see what the local talent's up to as awards are parsed out on Sunday.

(Through March 21) DEAR SARA JANE The scrappy staff at Hub Theatre is mounting its newest production, "Dear Sara Jane" at The Soundry art space in Vienna, Virginia, through March 21st. Victor Lodato's portrait of a young military wife is a humor-filled yet unrelenting examination of a culture of violence both abroad and at home.


No Meekness Here: Meet Rosa Parks, 'Lifelong Freedom Fighter'

As the 60th anniversary of the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott approaches, author Jeanne Theoharis says it's time to let go of the image of Rosa Parks as an unassuming accidental activist.

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.
WAMU 88.5

World Leaders Meet For The UN Climate Change Summit In Paris

World leaders meet for the UN climate change summit in Paris to discuss plans for reducing carbon emissions. What's at stake for the talks, and prospects for a major agreement.


Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.