Same-Sex Couples In D.C. Plan Weddings | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Same-Sex Couples In D.C. Plan Weddings

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Aisha Mills and Danielle Moodie were among the couples to apply for a marriage license today. They met at an Adams Morgan restaurant six years ago.
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Aisha Mills and Danielle Moodie were among the couples to apply for a marriage license today. They met at an Adams Morgan restaurant six years ago.

By Rebecca Sheir

Same-sex couples in D.C. can apply for marriage licenses, but the earliest they can get married is next Tuesday, since the district needs three business days to process the paperwork.

But some couples are waiting even longer, as they plan the wedding they've been dreaming of for years.

Aisha Mills has been engaged to Danielle Moodie since June. Their wedding is set for August.

"And it'll be very much like us," she says. "You know, fabulous and beautiful!"

Mills looks forward to being surrounded by family and friends. So does Greg Jones, who's shooting for an October wedding in a vineyard outside D.C.

"What's gonna be really just exciting is finally being able to have our family and friends standing up in front of us, and for us," he says. "And that's the most important part for us. And we wanna have fun. And no ties!"

Another couple already has had the wedding of their dreams--sort of.

"We got married on the beach in Hawaii, ten years ago," says Marlene Cohen.

But since Hawaii doesn't recognize same-sex marriage, Cohen says she looks forward to sealing the deal in D.C.

"We're getting married by a justice of the peace so we will be legally wed," she says, "and we're very excited about it."

Aisha Mills' fiancee, Danielle Moodie, says all Washingtonians should be excited today.

"We are such a progressive and thoughtful place, and now we are a shining beacon of justice," she says.

Even more shining than the engagement ring she's been wearing the past nine months: waiting for the day she could finally tie the knot.

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