Moran Pushes For Repeal Of 'Don't Ask Don't Tell' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Moran Pushes For Repeal Of 'Don't Ask Don't Tell'

Play associated audio

By Megan Hughes

Senators introduced a bill today to repeal the "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" policy and allow gays to openly serve in the military. Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) is urging Congress to move fast to make it happen.

For 30 years, retired Navy Captain Joan Darrah from Alexandria served in the military but kept her sexuality hidden because of "don’t ask, don’t tell."

"A simple comment such as ‘my partner and I went to the movies this weekend’ could have been the end of my career," she says.

Darrah is now pressing members of Congress to overturn the policy and her Congressman, Jim Moran, stands behind her.

"This should be done by the end of the year, it really should," says Moran. "And it shouldn’t be a factor in the elections, because most of the American people understand it’s time and it’s the right thing to do."

Bills have now been introduced in both the House and Senate, and congressional hearings are underway. Some military leaders and lawmakers say Congress should wait to make a decision until the Department of Defense completes its review later this year.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, March 30, 2015

You can see a few slapdash plays this weekend or check out some rarely seen portraits by a mid-20th century artist.

NPR

Cheez Whiz Helped Spread Processed Foods. Will It Be Squeezed Out?

Turns out, the history of Kraft's dull-orange cheese spread says a lot about the processed food industry — and where it might be headed as Kraft and Heinz merge.
WAMU 88.5

Will McAuliffe Make Good On Campaign Promises In Virginia?

Virginia lawmakers will be back in session next month, and the governor will try once again to deliver on the campaign promises that were central to his campaign.

NPR

App That Aims To Make Books 'Squeaky Clean' Draws Ire From Edited Writers

Clean Reader — an app designed to find, block and replace profanity in books — has drawn considerable criticism from authors. This week, makers of the app announced they would no longer sell e-books.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.