Moran Pushes For Repeal Of 'Don't Ask Don't Tell' | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Moran Pushes For Repeal Of 'Don't Ask Don't Tell'

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By Megan Hughes

Senators introduced a bill today to repeal the "Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell" policy and allow gays to openly serve in the military. Rep. Jim Moran (D-Va.) is urging Congress to move fast to make it happen.

For 30 years, retired Navy Captain Joan Darrah from Alexandria served in the military but kept her sexuality hidden because of "don’t ask, don’t tell."

"A simple comment such as ‘my partner and I went to the movies this weekend’ could have been the end of my career," she says.

Darrah is now pressing members of Congress to overturn the policy and her Congressman, Jim Moran, stands behind her.

"This should be done by the end of the year, it really should," says Moran. "And it shouldn’t be a factor in the elections, because most of the American people understand it’s time and it’s the right thing to do."

Bills have now been introduced in both the House and Senate, and congressional hearings are underway. Some military leaders and lawmakers say Congress should wait to make a decision until the Department of Defense completes its review later this year.

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