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Marion Barry Censured by DC City Council

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The censure of DC city councilman Marion Barry also led to his removal from an important chairmanship. Now the ward 8 councilman might also face legal charges

It was the first time the DC council has publicly punished one of its own. Barry on the other hand was reluctant to admit responsibility, saying the only thing he was guilty of, was poor judgment.

"Signing a contract with a person that I had a personal relationship with that should not have happened. It was bad judgment we all make em sometimes"

Council members allege Barry took kickback money from a friend who received a contract with Barrys help. Following the censure, the council voted to refer the matter the U.S Attorney for possible criminal prosecution. Barrys attorney Frederick Cooke says, thats like putting the chicken, before the egg.

"to take the extreme step of sanctioning someone based on allegations that havent been proven are problematic to me."

A criminal prosecution would be another hurdle in Barry's long career. But as some have noted, the former mayor has bounced back from similar problems he's faced in t he past.

Elliott Francis reports.

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