Some Say Metro Is Still A Good Deal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Some Say Metro Is Still A Good Deal

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By Kavitha Cardoza

Those using the Metro system might notice a temporary 10 cent surcharge which went into effect over the weekend. But advocates say it's still cheaper than public transportation in other large cities.

Richard Perry is adding money onto his Smart card at the Friendship Heights Metro station. He's not happy he'll have to pay 20 cents extra everyday.

"I felt they should give better service before they raised the prices," says Perry.

David Alpert edits the Greater Greater Washington website, which looks at transportation issues. He says even with a 10 cent increase Metro is cheaper than subway systems in New York and Chicago. Alpert says in those cities a one way trip costs a flat $2.25.

"Our base fares are less than $2.25 by quite a bit," says Alpert.

Metro prices increase depending on how far you travel, the most expensive fare on D.C.'s Metro is now $4.60.

"But that's even less than the $5-10 that some longer trips are on BART or many commuter rail systems," he says.

Beginning July, Metro is expected to introduce a permanent fare increase to help balance the budget for the next fiscal year.

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