QuestFest 2010 Brings "Textless" Theater To DC And Baltimore | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

QuestFest 2010 Brings "Textless" Theater To DC And Baltimore

Play associated audio

By Stephanie Kaye

With its roots in the deaf community, QuestFest 2010 begins soon, bringing theater without words to audiences in DC and Baltimore.

Director Fred Beam, speaking through interpreter Tony Barraza, is leading students through warm-ups for their show "Seeds." Maddie Osborne is in the production.

"My brother is deaf, and I don't know how to sign really. But he's been involved in this program so I joined this year," says Osborne.

Local and international performers will be presenting works that defy language barriers of any kind.

"I want to use theater to bring people together. I see theater as a celebration," says Tim McCarty, the festival's director.

"In an interpreted performance, a joke will be said on stage, the hearing audience laughs, the interpreters interpret it...and a minute or two later the DEAF audience laughs!" he says.

At QuestFest, says McCarty, everyone laughs at the same time, and the festival's offerings extend beyond the deaf community.

"The Washington-Baltimore area has over one million new immigrants. 36 percent of the population of the District of Columbia has less than a basic understanding of English," he says.

QuestFest 2010 begins Monday and runs through March 14th, with venues throughout DC and Baltimore.

NPR

Ellar Coltrane Speaks Of Growing Up On Screen In 'Boyhood'

Film director Richard Linklater's latest movie, Boyhood, was shot over 12 years. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks with the star of the film, Ellar Coltrane, who's spent over a decade shooting the movie.
NPR

What If The World Cup Were Awarded For Saving Trees And Drinking Soda?

We thought you'd get a kick out of seeing how the four teams in the final World Cup matches stack up in global health and development.
NPR

What Can $100 Million Buy You — Besides An Election In Kentucky?

Campaign spending on the Kentucky Senate race could reach $100 million. So what can that get you in the Bluegrass State? NPR's Tamara Keith finds out when she calls up some local business owners.
NPR

Tech Week: Google's World Cup Play, Amazon Sued And Kids Tracked

Also in this week's roundup, a tech company that may not exist, using sensors to keep your plants alive and what the debate over sandwich taxonomy teaches us about innovation.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.