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Vehicle Registration Fee Could Be Back In Fairfax

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By Jonathan Wilson

In Virginia, Fairfax's County Executive has laid out his plan to close a projected $250 million budget shortfall. It includes major cuts, a 5-cent tax rate increase, and the return of an old fee.

As part of his budget proposal, County Executive Anthony Griffin calls for the return of Fairfax's Vehicle Registration Fee.

Fairfax got rid of the fee in 2006 and county supervisor John Faust says the old fee was more trouble than it was worth.

"You had to scrape an old sticker off your car, put a new sticker on," says Faust. "For the amount of revenue that it raised, it was irritating."

This time the County Executive is proposing a fee without an accompanying decal requirement.

A $33 for most vehicles, the maximum fee allowed by Virginia Law would raise $27 million a year for the county.

Faust, who represents Fairfax's Dranesville District, says most constituents he's heard from support bringing back the fee, especially if the stickers don't come back with it.

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