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Senate Panel Wants Answers In Cheltenham Youth Facility Homicide

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By Meymo Lyons

A Maryland Senate panel is asking the Maryland's Department of Juvenile Services for a briefing on the killing of a teacher at the Cheltenham Youth Facility in Prince George's County.

State Sen. C. Anthony Muse, a Democrat from Prince George's county says lawmakers want answers.

Sixty-five-year-old Hannah Wheeling was a teacher and a counselor at Cheltenham. Her body was discovered Thursday morning outside the door of Murphy Cottage, a minimum security building outside the perimeter fence, which houses about 20 teens determined not to be a danger to themselves or others.

Wheeling died of multiple blunt force trauma. She had also been sexually assaulted. Law enforcement sources say the suspect in the case is a 13-year-old boy housed at Murphy Cottage. Sources also say investigators have a state-issued shirt with both the boy's name and victim's blood on it, and investigators are waiting for DNA results.

Despite the evidence, the boy will likely be charged as a juvenile not an adult.

The Cheltenham Youth Facility is run by the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services.

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