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Maryland Lawmakers React To Obama's Health Plan

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By Peter Granitz

Lawmakers in Maryland are reviewing President Obama's health care draft in preparation of Thursday's health care summit. But not all expect sweeping progress.

The White House is deeming the plan a compromise between both sides of the Capitol. The president's version will dole out cash to states to cover increased Medicare costs, cover more than 30 million new people and mandate people carry health insurance. It all comes at a cost of $950 billion. So politics is sure to shroud Thursday's meeting.

Maryland Democratic Senator Ben Cardin says he believes lawmakers can reach concrete results, if the other side cooperates.

"It depends on what their purpose is," says Cardin. "If their purpose is to show what we need in health reform, the Republicans have a chance on Thursday. If it is to be dilatory, we'll find out."

Neither Cardin nor Maryland's lone Republican will attend. Roscoe Bartlett says the president's plan doesn't provide enough specifics, and he doesn't buy the aid to states.

"We don't have any money except money we take from the states," says Bartlett. "This is a huge farce."

It's unclear when a final bill might be reached.

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