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The Aggravation Continues Over D.C. Snow Removal

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Government agencies and officials are continuing to field complaints about their handling of the recent snowstorms. Commentator Forbes Maner, a resident of Northwest Washington wrote this open letter to Mayor Adrian Fenty.

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Dear Mayor Fenty:

During the last two weeks, since the snow began on February 5th, you and the city government have asked city residents to be patient with your snow removal efforts. For the most part, this appears to have happened - we have endured miserable rush hours on roads that are not cleared; we have dug out our sidewalks and driveways, several times; and we have learned to drive on one-lane streets blocked by large mounds of snow - yet the public complaints and criticisms of the city's effort seem to have been fairly muted. We realize that this was an historic storm, and we have been patient and given you the benefit of the doubt.

No longer.

I live in Spring Valley. Our street was plowed first, Friday, February 5th, when the snow was about three inches deep, and a second time last Monday, by which time the street was hard-packed ice. The second plow merely pushed ice in front of spaces we had dug out for parking.

AU Park and Spring Valley streets are one lane, at best. There are piles of snow impeding traffic and parking, even on main routes like 46th Street. Parking is a real challenge; but we have managed by digging a lot and respecting our neighbors' efforts.

Friday morning, a D.C. Parking Enforcement car showed up on our street and started ticketing cars. The officer ticketed cars that were pointing the "wrong" way or not sufficiently parallel to the curb. She was indifferent to the mounds of snow blocking the parking spaces and the streets.

Access to our street is difficult because some of the surrounding streets have never been plowed. These are now icy with deep holes in the packed snow that impede driving.


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