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RICHMOND, Va. (AP) New legislation awaiting the OK of Gov. Bob McDonnell would make Virginia the 34th state to allow speed limits up to 70 mph. House lawmaker voted 76-22 today to pass a bill with the governor's backing that would allow a 70 mph limit on some highways.

FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) Residents of the area around Metro's busy West Falls Church rail yard are bracing for more construction noise. Authorities are preparing to add new tracks and another rail yard for commuter trains needed for the new Silver Line starting in 2013.

VIENNA, Va. (AP) Police say two men wanted for an attack on a northern Virginia cabbie will be extradited from North Carolina this week to face prosecution. Authorities say Ronald P. Carrigan and John D. Salath are charged with attempted robbery for the Jan. 31 attack in Vienna.

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) Virginia farmers who produce tree nuts, and other specialty vegetables are getting a boost from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The department says it is providing $500,00 in grant money to those farmers, who aren't covered by traditional crop insurance.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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