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Hundreds Celebrate Chinese New Year In D.C.

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Chinese culture is on parade during the Year Of The Tiger celebrations in Chinatown.
Kavitha Cardoza
Chinese culture is on parade during the Year Of The Tiger celebrations in Chinatown.

By Kavitha Cardoza

Even though the Chinese New Year celebration in D.C. was delayed a week because of the snow, it didn't stop hundreds of families from having a great time as they began the Year of the Tiger.

Hundreds of children waved flags as they watched shimmering red and gold dragons dance along the parade route. They were followed by drummers and dancers and people handing out little red envelopes for good luck. For some people like Alex Wong, it was about celebrating his own culture.

"I have two little kids and I want them to see what we do for Chinese New Year," says Wong.

For others it was learning about the unfamiliar. John Bader says he brought his sons to the parade to learn more about Chinese culture.

"It's marvelous, complex, hard to understand and contradictory. Also, my son and I were born in the Year of the Tiger so it seemed just right," says Bader.

Calvin Bader who's playing with little firecrackers says that means,

"I'm adventurous. I kind of take over stuff, like having control and I like to lead."

One woman laughed and said she wasn't here for the culture, but had broken all her New Years Resolutions and this was an opportunity to reset the clock!

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