"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, February 22, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, February 22, 2010

Play associated audio

(Through March 6) THEREABOUTS

The paintings of D.C. native Rodgers Naylor run the gamut, from the streets of Chicago to the light in canyons. His work is on display in the exhibit Here and There at Susan Calloway Fine Arts in Georgetown through March 6th. Naylor's art is warm and alive, using an alla prima technique that's as fresh as it sounds.

(Through August 15) LEAN ON ME Even presidents need someone to lean on. In Woodrow Wilson's case, make that some THING. The Woodrow Wilson House on DC's Embassy Row is dedicated to all things Wilsonian. Its newest exhibit, My Third Leg showcases a selection of the President's own walking sticks, props that provide a glance at an American folk tradition tinged with history.

(February 20) FABRIC OF OUR LIVES Inspired by her ancestors, Alfreda Gourdine-Southerland presents an array of textile sculptures in the African tradition, on display at ArtSpring Gallery in Maryland's Silver Spring. Sewing together silk and cotton, kente cloth and semi-precious stones, her work celebrates heritage and love of family.

NPR

Lowly Worm Is Back! Richard Scarry Jr. Brings Dad's Manuscript To Life

The younger Scarry, also an illustrator, found a draft of Best Lowly Worm Book Ever! in his dad's Swiss chalet. He says all that was missing was the final art, "so that's what I did."
NPR

A Food Crisis Follows Africa's Ebola Crisis

Food shortages are emerging in the wake of West Africa's Ebola epidemic. Market shelves are bare and fields are neglected because traders can't move and social gatherings are discouraged.
NPR

Uber Greases The Wheel With Obama's Old Campaign Manager

Uber is hiring David Plouffe, the mastermind of Obama's 2008 campaign, to power its own political strategy. What can a tech-savvy political animal offer a ride-sharing service?
NPR

Native Stories From Alaska Give Gamers Something To Play With

The video game Never Alone draws on a traditional Inupiaq story and the actual experiences of native Alaskan elders, storytellers and youth.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.