"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, February 22, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, February 22, 2010

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(Through March 6) THEREABOUTS

The paintings of D.C. native Rodgers Naylor run the gamut, from the streets of Chicago to the light in canyons. His work is on display in the exhibit Here and There at Susan Calloway Fine Arts in Georgetown through March 6th. Naylor's art is warm and alive, using an alla prima technique that's as fresh as it sounds.

(Through August 15) LEAN ON ME Even presidents need someone to lean on. In Woodrow Wilson's case, make that some THING. The Woodrow Wilson House on DC's Embassy Row is dedicated to all things Wilsonian. Its newest exhibit, My Third Leg showcases a selection of the President's own walking sticks, props that provide a glance at an American folk tradition tinged with history.

(February 20) FABRIC OF OUR LIVES Inspired by her ancestors, Alfreda Gourdine-Southerland presents an array of textile sculptures in the African tradition, on display at ArtSpring Gallery in Maryland's Silver Spring. Sewing together silk and cotton, kente cloth and semi-precious stones, her work celebrates heritage and love of family.

NPR

Living Small In The City: With More Singles, Micro-Housing Gets Big

Single people represent the fastest growing category of households in the U.S. That's made small dwellings — from micro-apartments to stand-alone tiny houses, a niche force in the real estate market.
NPR

Don't Be Fooled By The Fishy Ingredients: This Burger Is Delicious

Chef Marcus Samuelsson has a ritual whenever he travels to a new place — ask the cabdriver, "Where do you eat?" When he did that on a trip to Barbados, he fell in love with a fish sandwich.
WAMU 88.5

Hogan Refutes Claims That His Charter-School Bill Is A Union Buster

More than half of the state's 47 charter schools are located in Baltimore, and Hogan believes making it easier for more to open there — and elsewhere in Maryland — would help close the widening achievement gap between white students and students of color.
NPR

FCC Votes Along Party Lines For 'Net Neutrality'

The new rules, if approved, would require service providers to be a neutral gateway to the Internet, instead of handling different types of traffic in different ways — and at different costs.

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