: News

Filed Under:

Some Women Protest Worship Practice At Islamic Center Of Washington

Play associated audio

By Kavitha Cardoza

Some women at the Islamic Center of Washington want to be able to pray in the main prayer hall with their male counterparts.

Women at one mosque in Northwest D.C. usually pray behind a 7-foot wooden partition, at the back corner of this ornate worship hall. Fatima Thompson, who organized the protest, says she cannot see the imam, or leader of the mosque, speak.

"It's degrading; it disenfranchises women," she says. It separates me from the rest of the congregation as a community member."

Thompson stood shoulder to shoulder with approximately 20 other women and prayed in the main hall. The mosque's management called D.C. police, who asked them to leave or be arrested.

Syed Burmi, the Imam of Islamic Society of Western Maryland, says the partition helps maintain women's privacy and modesty as well as keep the focus on prayer.

"It is not because we feel someone is superior or someone is inferior," he says.

In recent years, there have been calls to end the practice of separate prayer spaces in mosques around the country including Boston, Chicago and West Virginia.

WAMU 88.5

Rita Dove: "Collected Poems: 1974 - 2004"

A conversation with Rita Dove, former U.S. poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize-winner.

NPR

Frozen Food Fears: 4 Things To Know About The Listeria Recall

The FDA issued a massive recall of frozen fruits and vegetables this week. Here's what you need to know about the nasty bug that's causing all the problems.
WAMU 88.5

Back From The Breach: Moving The Federal Workforce Forward

A year after a massive cyber breach compromised the databases of the Office of Personnel Management, Kojo talks with OPM Acting Director Beth Cobert about her agency and key issues facing the federal workforce.

WAMU 88.5

Why Medical Error Is The Third Leading Cause Of Death In The U.S.

New research shows medical error is the third leading cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 250,000 people a year. Why there are so many mistakes, and what can be done to improve patient safety.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.