"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, February 17, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Wednesday, February 17, 2010

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(February 17) THAT FACE Precocious London playwright Polly Stenham was just 19 years old when she penned the play That Face. It opens tonight at Studio Theatre near D.C.'s Logan Circle. The shocking story about a violent encounter at an all-girls school skewers the seedy side of the British bourgeoisie with pitch-black humor.

(February 17-21) tempODYSSEY You can catch even more dark comedy at George Mason University's Black Box Theater at the school's Fairfax campus tonight through the 21st. Temp ODYSSEY follows a cursed office temp who believes she's the goddess of death during a day on the job.

(February 17) MIRACLE BANANA And the Japanese Embassy welcomes visitors to a screening of the movie Miracle Banana tonight at 6:30 in Northwest Washington. The documentary focuses on a young embassy worker's plan to turn banana tree scraps into useful paper products, proving that with hope, great things happen for those who believe. Presented in Japanese with English subtitles.

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