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Local Bakery Celebrates Fat Tuesday With Traditional Treats

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Paczki's are a favorite indulgence for many who celebrate Fat Tuesday.
Elliot Francis
Paczki's are a favorite indulgence for many who celebrate Fat Tuesday.

By Elliott Francis

Today is 'Fat Tuesday,' English for Mardi Gras. Typically celebrated in New Orleans, the tradition involves a final indulgence in food and drink before lent. One local bakery marks the day with a baked holiday favorite.

If you want some Fat Tuesday indulgence, some think there's no better way to do it than with a Paczki. (pronounced PUSH-kee).

On this Fat Tuesday, folks are lined up at Woodmore Pastry in Silver Spring. Sharon Green says it's one of the few bakeries where you can find this and other Mardi Gras treats.

"I was coming for the king cake, and I saw the sign so I knew I had to get one."

Mark Sheehan says he's not sure he wants one.

"...And this is pronounced? A puch-key?...pach-key," he asks.

That is until he sees one of the chubby powdery pastries under the counter.

"Alright so I gotta do one," he says. "Yeah, I gotta do one."

They really are unavoidable, especially if you'll be avoiding such things for Lent, which starts tomorrow.


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