Maryland Authorities Arrest 15 In Valentine's Scheme | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Maryland Authorities Arrest 15 In Valentine's Scheme

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BALTIMORE (AP) The Anne Arundel County sheriff's office made 15 arrests using a fake Valentine's Day delivery service.

Deputies worked under the company name "Keystone Candigrams" to serve warrants. They contacted suspects to set up a time for a presumed gift delivery on Sunday.

Instead, authorities showed up with a candy box designed with handcuffs and the scales of justice. Sheriff Ron Bateman says recipients "schedule their own arrests."

Twenty-three-year-old Timothy Lawn of Glen Burnie was arrested for failing to appear in court on traffic charges. Lawn says when he saw them, he "figured it out."

The sheriff's office has used similar phony delivery services in the past to chip away at thousands of unserved warrants.

Information from: The (Baltimore) Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com (Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

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