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DPW Chief Defends Slow Trash Collection

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By Peter Granitz

The head of Washington's Department of Public Works is defending the decision to not pick up trash today.

William Howland says his agency will collect everyone's trash this week, but will not haul away recycling. Collection was suspended last week, leaving some residents with more than a week and a half's worth of garbage. Howland says it would've been more difficult to shift collection around the already scheduled holiday.

"Some people would put it on Monday, others would say normally you pick it up on Tuesday," he says. "We just want to minimize any confusion. It's been a difficult time for everyone, if we just stick to our normal holiday schedule, it'll be easier for everyone."

Not everyone is satisfied. Tambra Stevenson, with the Washington Metropolitan Public Health Association, says this new round of snow is the last chance for DPW to not only successfully pick up trash, but also clear the roads.

"They've already had two times, so three strikes and you're out," says Stevenson. "Hopefully we'll weather the storm once again. If not it may mean heads in November."

Residents are supposed to put trash in plastic bags in front of their homes this week.


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