: News

Filed Under:

Snow Doesn't Freeze Local Pooper-Scooper Laws

Play associated audio
Mark Burnett of Doody Calls in Fairfax, VA urges pet owners to scoop the poop off the snow.
Rebecca Sheir
Mark Burnett of Doody Calls in Fairfax, VA urges pet owners to scoop the poop off the snow.

By Rebecca Sheir

With all the snow around, dog walkers might not make it a priority to scoop their pooches' poop. And they could be breaking the law.

Washington, D.C., and Fairfax County, Virginia are just two local jurisdictions with so-called "pooper-scooper laws," which require owners to pick up after their dogs.

Mark Burnett works for the pet-waste-removal service, Doody Calls. As he explains during a 'doody' run in Vienna, Fairfax County also directs owners on how to dispose of doggie doo.

"All pet waste has to be double-bagged," he says. "And they want it to be a dark-colored bag. It has to be knot-tied, and that's knot-tied as in k-n-o-t."

If they don't they face a $25 to $200 fine.

And bad weather is no excuse. The laws stay in place even if its raining cats and dogs or, in this case, snowing them.

NPR

Jhumpa Lahiri Finds Freedom In Italian Memoir: 'No One Expected Me To Do It'

The Interpreter of Maladies author is a successful, Pulitzer Prize-winning English-language writer. But she found writing in Italian gave her true freedom; "Language is a very messy thing," she says.
NPR

Gulf Of Mexico Open For Fish-Farming Business

For the first time, companies can apply to set up fish farms in U.S. federal waters. The government says the move will help reduce American dependence on foreign seafood and improve security.
WAMU 88.5

What's Behind Trends In U.S. Violent Crime Rates

FBI data suggest there was a slight uptick in violent crime in the first half of last year, but overall violent crime rates in the U.S. have dropped dramatically over the last twenty years. What led to the long-term decline, and why do some say it’s likely to continue?

WAMU 88.5

Blocked: Twitter's Role In Combating Violent Extremism

Over the course of seven months, Twitter has suspended over 125,000 accounts for threatening or promoting terrorist acts.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.