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More Funding For Metro Unlikely, Says Federal Appointee

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With Metro's multimillion dollar budget deficit, there are calls for more money than the $150 million the Obama administration recently allocated for Metro's infrastructure.
David Schultz
With Metro's multimillion dollar budget deficit, there are calls for more money than the $150 million the Obama administration recently allocated for Metro's infrastructure.

By David Schultz

The Obama administration recently allocated $150 million dollars to Metro for infrastructure improvements. But with Metro's massive budget deficit and a high-profile string of accidents, including yesterday's red line derailment, there have been calls for more.

Mortimer Downey, Metro's newest Board Member, doesn't see it happening. "Not terribly likely," is how he describes the chances of increased federal funding for Metro.

The Obama administration appointed Downey to the Metro Board last month as part of an increase in federal transit oversight. Downey says before Metro receives more federal funding, it needs to right its ship.

"I think Metro has to get the ship on the right course and assure that the crew is all rowing in the same direction before we talk about funding," he says.

Downey also says there will be more federal appointments to Metro's Board of Directors in the near future.

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