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Snow-Bound Florists Play Catch-Up On Valentine Deliveries

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Baltimore floral designer Lana Brown busily fills orders that were delayed because of this week’s storm.
Cathy Duchamp
Baltimore floral designer Lana Brown busily fills orders that were delayed because of this week’s storm.

By Cathy Duchamp

The Friday before Valentine's Day is traditionally a big day for flower deliveries to the workplace. But this week's storm may crimp Cupid's reach.

Spencer Klein depends on Valentine's Day for his livelihood.

"Stress level is up there but I haven't blown my top yet," says Klein.

Klein runs a shop called "My Flower Box" in Baltimore's Federal Hill neighborhood.

This week's storm couldn't have come at a worse time for him. Sales are down. Flower shipments from wholesalers are delayed. Which means Klein is struggling to get the orders he does have out on time.

He's calling in some favors from friends to deliver bouquets

"I can't guarantee when they'll get there," he says. "But with the help of some 4 wheel drive vehicles and some hard work we'll do the best that we can. Thank God Valentine's Day is on a Sunday!"

A florist in D.C. jokes that Valentine's Day should be moved from wintry February to August.

The U.S. Postal Service says Valentine's Day weekend is its second busiest of the year. A Postal Service spokeswoman for the D.C. area says carriers hope to be caught up on Valentine deliveries in time for the holiday. That will, of course, depend on road conditions.


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