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For Nat'l Guard, Snow Recovery Just Another Mission

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Master Sergeant Ray Wilkerson is holed up inside the D.C. Police Headquarters building. The Guard is using this as its temporary home base.

Outside, it's a near white-out, but Wilkerson isn't impressed. He's been stationed in Northern Europe, upstate New York - much colder places than this.

"I grew up all over the world so this is really nothing," he says. "It's just a little snow storm compared to some of the snowstorms that are out there," says Wilkerson

Wilkerson says a big storm would be one that drops up to seven feet of snow.

Staff Sergeant Kevin Hargrave is driving through the blizzard in an Army humvee. He says his biggest challenge is avoiding civilians. In fact, Hargrave says this isn't too different from the last time he drove a humvee through snow.

That was in Afghanistan.

"It's about the same actually," says Hargrave. "It really is. Because the Afghans come out in the snow also. Snow doesn't stop them."

The guardsmen are using their humvees to escort police officers, fire fighters and doctors who are snowed in.

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