"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, February 11, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Thursday, February 11, 2010

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(February 11) B.B. KING & BUDDY GUY The formula for blues brilliance is squared, as B.B. King and Buddy Guy make their way to the District, taking the stage at DAR Constitution Hall tonight at 8.

(February 12-20) HOTEL CASSIOPEIA American artist Joseph Cornell lived a reclusive life in his mother's basement in Queens. His art emerges during the show Hotel Cassiopeia at the Clarice Smith Center of the Performing Arts Center in College Park, Maryland, opening tomorrow and running through the 20th. Shaped by years of caring for his disabled brother, Cornell's art has become both influential and revered in the avant-garde movement.

(February 13) RHODES SCHOLARS Tacoma Park rockers The Rhodes Tavern Troubadours take the stage for a show that the whole family can "throw shapes to" at [The Avalon Theater] (http://www.theavalon.org/) in DC's Chevy Chase, Saturday morning at 10. You've got to get up early to get down with the smartest rock band in town.

NPR

Peru's Pitmasters Bury Their Meat In The Earth, Inca-Style

Step up your summer grilling game by re-creating the ancient Peruvian way of cooking meat underground in your own backyard. It's called pachamanca, and it yields incredibly moist and smoky morsels.
WAMU 88.5

Food Packaging & Pricing

Have you ever popped open a bag of potato chips only to be disappointed by the number of crisps in your bag? It's not just you. To avoid raising prices, companies often increase their "nonfunctional slack fill" or the difference between the volume of product and its container. We talk about how food packaging affects your recipe and wallet.

WAMU 88.5

Environmental Outlook: The Growing Fossil Fuel Divestment Movement

A look at the growing fossil fuel divestment movement.

NPR

Flood Maps Can Get Much Sharper With A Little Supercomputing Oomph

Entrepreneurs are turning to Oak Ridge National Lab's supercomputer to make all sorts of things, including maps that are much more accurate in predicting how a neighborhood will fare in a flood.

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