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Police Chief Lanier Urges Residents To Stay Off The Streets

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D.C. Police monitor snow conditions at headquarters.
Patrick Madden
D.C. Police monitor snow conditions at headquarters.

By Patrick Madden

Police in D.C. are urging people to stay off of the streets.

"Treacherous is an understatement; the visibility is slightly below the hood of your car," says D.C. Police Chief Cathy Lanier.

Despite the blizzard, Lanier says police have been out in full force responding to calls.

"The biggest ones we are getting outside of normal calls for service are going to be building collapses," she says.

Police have been monitoring weather conditions in their command center at police headquarters. It’s a huge amphitheater-type room filled with televisions and monitors. Typically, the screens are tuned to closed circuit cameras--today, it’s the weather channel and traffic cameras.

Even with the white-out conditions, car accidents and roof collapses, Lanier says the call volume is down.

"So I am really pleased that people are not dialing 911 for non-emergencies," she says.

The chief says she has one request for residents right now: stay indoors and off of the streets.

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