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Canopy Collapses At American University

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A canopy between two buildings collapsed this morning at American University in Washington, D.C.
The Eagle/Nicole Glass
A canopy between two buildings collapsed this morning at American University in Washington, D.C.

Approximately half of a canopy between Mary Graydon Center and Battelle collapsed this morning. The part left standing was closest to Butler Pavilion, according to American University's student run newspaper The Eagle.

The Eagle reports that few people were outside and no emergency vehicles were nearby after the collapse.

The bridge opened in 2008, with the canopy opening shortly thereafter, The Eagle previously reported.

The Eagle reports that Student Union Board Director Clay Pencek, who was working the information desk in MGC, said the collapse happened around 11:40 a.m., and that there were no injuries.

The Eagle also reports that the builder of the canopy has been contacted, and plans are being developed for a repair or replacement of the structure, University Architect Jerry Gager said in an e-mail.

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