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As Storm Bears Down, A Fallen Tree Looms

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There's a 25-foot pine tree lying across the street near Selena Smart's home in northwest D.C.

It's been there for four days.

"I'm not sure what else to do," she says. "I don't own a chainsaw."

The tree fell during this weekend's storm, its branches landing on a set of overhead utility lines. But the lines didn't break, so the branches are hanging precariously in mid-air.

With more snow on the way, Smart's worried it's only a matter of time before the lines give way and she loses power.

"God help us if we do," she says. "I have a whole freezer full of meat, because my parents are farmers and so I bought half a steer, and if it goes, I'm in trouble. It could be a smelly mess."

A few yards away, Smart's neighbor, Jim Gasser, is shoveling snow away from his car. The fallen pine isn't his only concern. Gasser's also worried about the 70-foot oak tree right across the street, which is, as of now, still standing.

"If that fell," he says, "It would fall right on our house."

Gasser's hoping that won't happen. But until these snow storms let up, he looks out his front window and worries.

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