"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, February 9, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, February 9, 2010

Play associated audio

There are plenty of escapes for those looking to forget the flakes...

(February 9) DR. JOHN If you're getting sick of the snow, go see the doctor. New Orleans native Dr. John performs at the Birchmere Music Hall in Alexandria tonight at 7:30, offering a dose of the Big Easy's finest voodoo rock, R&B, and funk, backed by his crew The Lower 911.

(February 9) GALA FLAMENCA The 10th Annual Flamenco Festival stomps through the Lisner Auditorium tonight at 8 in Northwest D.C. Gala Flemenca features mesmerizing choreography courtesy of some of the finest and most daring young stars out of Andalucia.

(February 9-14) MARIINSKY BALLET D.C.'s dalliance with snow is but a drop in the bucket for what the dancers in Russia's Mariinsky Ballet usually deal with. They return to the Kennedy Center tonight through Valentine's Day. One of the world's most influential dance companies over the past 200 years, the Mariinsky performs Sergeyev's 1952 version of the fairy tale ballet, The Sleeping Beauty.

NPR

MacArthur Fellow Terrance Hayes: Poems Are Music, Language Our Instrument

Hayes, a professor of writing at the University of Pittsburgh, was recognized for "reflecting on race, gender, and family in works that seamlessly encompass both the historical and the personal."
NPR

Diet Soda May Alter Our Gut Microbes And The Risk Of Diabetes

There's a new wrinkle to the old debate over diet soda: Artificial sweeteners may alter our microbiomes. And for some, this may raise blood sugar levels and set the stage for diabetes.
NPR

House Passes Bill That Authorizes Arming Syrian Rebels

Even though it was backed by both party leaders, the vote split politicians within their own ranks. The final tally on the narrow military measure was 273 to 156.
NPR

3.7 Million Comments Later, Here's Where Net Neutrality Stands

A proposal about how to maintain unfettered access to Internet content drew a bigger public response than any single issue in the Federal Communication Commission's history. What's next?

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.