"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, February 8, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Monday, February 8, 2010

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(Feb 9-Apr 4) DEMON BARBER On the heels of some horrific weather, Signature Theatre opens a horrific play. Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street arrives in Shirlington, Virginia tomorrow night, charming and terrorizing audiences through April 4th. Helen Hayes-award winning actor Sherri Edelen reprises the role of the love-struck Mrs. Lovett, who serves up tasty meat pies with a barber bent on revenge.

(February 5-28) CULTURE OF THE MIND The Montpelier Arts Center features the exhibit Culture of the Mind and Spirit, local artists who share their common heritage and local connections. There's a reception on Friday where audiences can meet the artists from 7 to 9 p.m.

(February 8) DRESSED TO DANCE DC's Corcoran Gallery hosts Dressed To Dance fashion show tonight at 7, showcasing the movement and music of Madrid, as dancers perform in costumes created by Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dali and other contemporary Spanish fashionistas.

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