Workers Shovel Out Cars For Uncertain Work Week | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Workers Shovel Out Cars For Uncertain Work Week

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In DC, residents continue to dig their way out of the snow. But not everyone is certain whether it will be clear enough in time for work tomorrow.

Mayor Adrian Fenty says crews are covering all areas of the city and are reaching residential side streets. But that's not enough for some people living in Northeast Washington.

A man named Derrick - who only gave his first name - says he needs to leave his house at 4:45 in the morning to make it to Gaithersburg for work. Unlike most people, he's sure he'll be needed. He works at the Post Office.

Derrick and a few neighbors were shoveling their cars and the alley they share. He says if he can get the car out of the alley, he’ll be fine. "They haven't been through here yet, as you see. Does that always happen? This is DC. You never know what to expect, so you need to deal with it."

For those hoping to take public transit, Metro has yet to announce when it will resume above-ground trains.

Peter Granitz reports.

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