Snow Could Disable Neighborhood Roads | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Snow Could Disable Neighborhood Roads

Play associated audio

By David Schultz

Even if you are able to get your car out of your driveway, there may be many streets throughout the region that won't be passable for days.

Mylissa Kennedy, a spokesperson with Arlington, Virginia's snow-clearing administration, says it will get to the neighborhoods after the main roads get plowed.

"And we should also note," she says, "That it is expected to be a windy storm, so there may be many passes needed on the primary roads before we consider them clear and then move on to secondary and neighborhood streets."

Lon Anderson with AAA Mid-Atlantic says local governments know snow plows have their limits.

"At some point you run out of places to put all of that snow and I'm sure those are the kinds of things they're going to be looking at," he says. "Where do you put all of that snow?"

Arlington County is asking car owners who normally park on the street to move their vehicles onto the curb so the plows have more room.

NPR

Wexford Carols Brings Irish Holiday Relics To Life

A new Christmas music collection resurrects Irish carols from the 17th century. NPR's Scott Simon talks to singer Caitriona O'Leary and producer Joe Henry about songs both sacred and political.
NPR

Antarctic Holiday: A Christmas Feast In The Loneliest Spot On Earth

For Dr. Gavin Francis, Christmas Eve marked the start of a year-long stay in an icy research base 8,700 miles from home. In this "empire of ice and isolation," he says, food is essential to morale.
NPR

'Rum, Rumba, And Romance': A Book On Cuba's Enduring Mystique

This week, President Obama announced that he will begin to normalize relations with Cuba. Cuban-American writer Richard Blanco recommends a book about Cuba's imprint on the American imagination.
NPR

Obama: Sony Should Have Talked To Him Before Pulling 'The Interview'

The FBI has concluded North Korea was responsible for the cyber attack on Sony Pictures. NPR's Scott Simon talks with White House correspondent Scott Horsley about what happens now.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.