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New Lessons For Youth At The Library Of Congress

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By Stephanie Kaye

A new online exhibit created by the Library of Congress takes a look back at the work of the NAACP, while preserving its history for the next generation.

The website was announced at the Library's Coolidge Auditorium on Capitol Hill, amid tributes both musical and historical.

"When we read movement history, the purpose should be to learn how to move forward as a country," says Benjamin Jealous, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "The NAACP's history being online allows us to continue a tradition of inspiring people."

One of those people is Junior "ROTC" Cadet Cindy Amaya, a senior at Bell Multicultural High School in northwest D.C.

"I think everybody should know where we've come from, the people who lived before us, what sacrifices they did in order to make huge changes," she says.

The online exhibit is part of a Library of Congress tribute to the NAACP during Black History Month. Events will conclude with a public forum on February 26th.

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