New Lessons For Youth At The Library Of Congress | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

: News

Filed Under:

New Lessons For Youth At The Library Of Congress

Play associated audio

By Stephanie Kaye

A new online exhibit created by the Library of Congress takes a look back at the work of the NAACP, while preserving its history for the next generation.

The website was announced at the Library's Coolidge Auditorium on Capitol Hill, amid tributes both musical and historical.

"When we read movement history, the purpose should be to learn how to move forward as a country," says Benjamin Jealous, president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. "The NAACP's history being online allows us to continue a tradition of inspiring people."

One of those people is Junior "ROTC" Cadet Cindy Amaya, a senior at Bell Multicultural High School in northwest D.C.

"I think everybody should know where we've come from, the people who lived before us, what sacrifices they did in order to make huge changes," she says.

The online exhibit is part of a Library of Congress tribute to the NAACP during Black History Month. Events will conclude with a public forum on February 26th.

NPR

The World Music Education of Philip Glass

In his new memoir, Music Without Words, the composer explains how a chance meeting with Ravi Shankar sparked a fascination with the cultures of the world and their music.
NPR

PepsiCo Swaps Diet Drink's Aspartame For Other Artificial Sweeteners

The company says Diet Pepsi consumers are concerned about aspartame. But the Food and Drug Administration has long affirmed that the sweetener is safe in amounts commonly used by beverage companies.
NPR

8 Obama Jokes That Stood Out From The White House Correspondents Dinner

Every year, the president sits down for dinner with Washington reporters and delivers a standup routine. From his "bucket list" to Hillary Clinton, here's what he came up with this year.
NPR

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers are betting this kind of behavior will become the norm.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.