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Former Juvenile Justice Director Blamed For Being Too Lenient

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By Kate Sheehy

A report finds the District's former juvenile justice director let 2.5 hours pass before calling police after a 17-year-old inmate escaped from a cookout at his home. Vincent Schiraldi's less-regimented approach to juvenile detention is being blamed for the teenager's escape in May of 2008.

A report by the city's inspector general obtained by The Washington Post found Schiraldi made several other missteps during the incident.

It concludes Schiraldi's actions gave preference to the teenagers invited to the cookout, and as a result "affected adversely the confidence of the public in the integrity of government."

Schiraldi recently left the director's post to head the New York City Department of Probation.

D.C. Attorney General Peter Nickles says Mayor Fenty's administration will review the report to make sure the city is providing the best care possible and complying with laws and regulations.

NPR

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