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Circulator Bus To Extend To Virginia

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By David Schultz

This week, the Council gave preliminary approval to a measure creating a new route for the Circulator, those red-and-gray buses that run through downtown D.C. The route would go from Dupont Circle to the Rosslyn Metro Station in Arlington.

That didn't sit well with Council Member Kwame Brown (D-At Large). He wants the Circulator to service D.C. neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River before it goes into Virginia.

John Lisle, a spokesman with the District's Department of Transportation, says that's a possibility.

"It's good to see that people are interested in the Circulator and that there is a lot of discussion about wanting to see it in new parts of the city. Obviously we have to be careful about how we expand, and weigh the costs and the benefits," says Lisle.

Lisle says the new Circulator route will replace the city-funded Georgetown Blue Bus, so it won't cost the city more money. He says that wouldn't necessarily be the case for an extension east of the Anacostia.

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