WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Latest D.C. Local News

Play associated audio

WASHINGTON (AP) George Washington University's medical school has been taken off probation by its academic accrediting agency. Dean James Scott announced today that the Liaison Committee on Medical Education extended the school's full accreditation for eight years.

WASHINGTON (AP) A judge has dismissed a lawsuit by members of the nation's oldest black sorority, who sought to remove their president over alleged financial misdeeds. D.C. Superior Court Judge Natalia M. Combs Greene dismissed the lawsuit against Alpha Kappa Alpha on Monday.

WASHINGTON (AP) A Utah senator has filed legislation that would prevent D.C. from implementing a gay marriage bill until residents vote on the issue. The bill would ban the district from issuing same-sex marriage licenses until residents are allowed to vote on the issue.

WASHINGTON (AP) A D.C. fire official says three children are in critical condition after a fire in an apartment building. Firefighters were called to the 1900 block of Naylor Road southeast this morning and found smoke coming from the second floor of the three story building.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


'Not Without My Daughter' Subject Grows Up, Tells Her Own Story

"Not Without My Daughter" told the story of an American mother and daughter fleeing Iran. Now that young girl is telling her own story in her memoir, "My Name is Mahtob."

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

Proposed Climate Change Rules At Odds With U.S. Opponents

President Obama says the U.S. must lead the charge to reduce burning of fossil fuels. But American lawmakers are divided on limiting carbon emissions and opponents say they'll challenge any new rules.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.