: News

Metro Police Officers Swarm Union Station For Anti-Terror Drill

Play associated audio
Approximately 50 police officers participate in anti-terror drill during rush hour.
Kavitha Cardoza
Approximately 50 police officers participate in anti-terror drill during rush hour.

By Kavitha Cardoza

Metro police swarmed Union Station for a anti-terrorism training exercise this morning. It's part of a three day drill that will involve more than 200 first responders from surrounding counties as well as the FBI.

Michelle Alsted takes the red line every morning from Silver Spring to Union Station. She looks around, surprised by police carrying machine guns and leading sniffer dogs.

"This is new," she says. "They're not normally here. I've never seen them before".

Approximately 50 police participated in what Metro is calling "Blue TIDE," which stands for Terrorism Identification and Deterrence Effort. The Deputy Police Chief for Metro, David Webb, says officers spread out near the metrocars and buses, making eye contact with commuters and looking for suspicious packages. He says this is also a visible reminder to commuters to be alert.

"There are 1.2 million people in this system everyday," he says, "and we really rely on them to say something. The old slogan 'if you see something say something' is really what we're looking for."

Commuters and police will have another chance to practice tomorrow and Thursday, with scenarios involving bombs and shootings.

NPR

Woody Allen's 'Fading Gigolo' Full Of Loneliness And Longing

In the new comedy Fading Gigolo, John Turturro plays the title character, and Woody Allen plays his pimp. This story originally broadcast on All Things Considered on April 18, 2014.
NPR

Soup to Nuts, Restaurants Smoke It All

While you won't find cigarettes in restaurants anymore, some smoking isn't banned. It's not just meat, either; it's hot to smoke just about anything edible.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Remains At Odds With Feds On Medicaid Expansion

Lawmakers in Virginia continue to resist the $9.6 billion Medicaid expansion on offer from the federal government as part of the Affordable Care Act.

NPR

Watch For The Blind Lets You Feel Time Passing

A new watch allows the blind to feel time on their wrists. Designer Hyungsoo Kim tells NPR's Wade Goodwyn his watch allows users to tell time accurately without revealing their disabilities.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.