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Court Orders Maryland Police To Turn Over 10,000 Documents

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By Rebecca Blatt

An appeals court is ordering the Maryland State Police to turn over about 10,000 documents relating to allegations of racial profiling by state troopers. The ruling is part of a long-running legal battle between the state police and the NAACP.

In 2003, a consent decree required the state police to work to stop racial profiling. The NAACP wants to inspect internal affairs documents to determine whether state police are properly investigating racial profiling allegations.

State police say the documents should be confidential because they are personnel records. The Maryland Court of Special Appeals rejected that argument.

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