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D.C. Poll Rates Rhee Much Lower

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D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee's job approval rating has dropped.
Kavitha Cardoza
D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee's job approval rating has dropped.

By Kavitha Cardoza

Support for D.C. School's Chancellor Michelle Rhee is falling, according to a new Washington Post poll. Rhee's job approval rating has dropped over the past two years, even though residents of the district believe the public school system is beginning to improve.

Rhee's performance was viewed favorably by almost 60 percent of residents in January 2008, with approximately 30 percent disapproving. Now it's almost even: 43 percent approve of what she's doing, while 44 percent are dissatisfied.

Those with children in D.C. public schools have nearly reversed their opinion of Rhee. Two years ago, 54 percent of parents approved of her; now, 54 percent disapprove. And support for Rhee has fallen dramatically among African-Americans, with almost twice as many "strongly disapproving" of her performance.

But residents also believe violence in schools has declined. Under Rhee, the graduation rate and standardized test scores have improved.

Almost 1,200 D.C. residents participated in the poll.

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