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General Motors Plant To Bring Green Technology To Maryland

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By Elliott Francis

A General Motors plant in Maryland will play a key role in the production of green auto technology, and local lawmakers say they hope the stimulus-funded effort will hold great promise for the future.

Soon Baltimore Transmission, located in White Marsh, Maryland, will be the first high volume, electric motor manufacturing site in the U.S., made possible in part by a $100 million stimulus fund grant. The move will create 200 jobs and a future for local manufacturing, according to Sen. Barbara Milkulski (D-Md.).

"The old saying goes: a country that can’t make something, can’t make something of itself," she says.

The motors will power future hybrid and electric cars. And Sen. Ben Cardin says there’s an added benefit.

"Don’t underestimate what’s going on here in White Marsh to make our nation safer so we don’t have to import oil from nations who don’t like us," says Cardin. Production of the new motors is expected to begin in 2013.

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