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Developers, Environmentalists At Odds Over New Maryland Regulations

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By Natalie Neumann

Maryland's Department of the Environment is trying to resolve a conflict between developers and environmentalists over regulations for how builders manage runoff from their projects. The rules are supposed to go into effect in May. Now the Chair of the House Environmental Matters Committee is threatening legislation if the conflict isn't resolved. The proposed rules make exceptions for redevelopment of already existing properties, but developers say they still go too far.

Committee Chair Maggie McIntosh, a Democrat from Baltimore City said the program passed in 2007 almost unanimously.

"It had the support of local government, developers in the state. So somewhere in the next month we need to get back to that position," says McIntosh.

Jon Laria, Chair of the state's task force on the future for growth and development, says the state should strive to preserve the bay and environment, but at the same time encourage investment and avoid unnecessary burdens on local government.

"I'm not at all convinced that these goals are irreconcilable but I'm also not convinced that we've reconciled them yet," says Laria.

The task force on the issue will meet again February 1.


'Washington Post' Reporter Explores How Pop Culture Influences Views Of Police

NPR's Kelly McEvers talks to Washington Post reporter Alyssa Rosenberg, who has written a series for the paper about how Hollywood and pop culture has influenced the way the public perceives police.

In 'Appetites,' Bourdain Pleases The Toughest Food Critic (His 9-Year-Old)

Anthony Bourdain's new cookbook features comfort food he cooks for his young daughter. "She's who I need to please, and if she's not happy, I'm not happy," he says.
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The Politics Hour - October 28, 2016

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton joins us as the new series "Good Girls Revolt" based on her early civil rights work debuts.


Qualcomm Spends Big Money To Get In The Car (Chip) Business

The smartphone chipmaker has agreed to buy NXP Semiconductors for $38 billion. The deal allows Qualcomm to rely less on the smartphone industry. NXP makes semiconductors for cars.

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