MarylandReporter.com: State Roundup Jan. 26, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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MarylandReporter.com: State Roundup Jan. 26, 2010

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Gov. Martin O'Malley released his 2010 legislative agenda with a focus on changes to unemployment insurance, jobs, renewable energy, education and public safety, writes Julie Bykowicz in The Baltimore Sun. O'Malley's legislative agenda includes a proposal for homeowners to request face-to-face meetings with their lenders to find alternatives to foreclosure, writes Nick Sohr in The Daily Record.

Former U.S. Sen. Charles Mathias passed away yesterday. The Baltimore Sun's staff takes a look into the former Senator's life. The three-term U.S. senator died in his Chevy Chase home, writes Matt Schudel in The Washington Post. Current lawmakers reacted to the news of his death in the Associated Press story by Brian Witte. The Post also ran an editorial on the late senator saying he was a principled moderate who aided his state and county.

The General Assembly's top budget analyst advised lawmakers to consider a second budget plan in case the stimulus funds O'Malley's budget relies on doesn't come through, writes Annie Linskey with The Baltimore Sun.

The governor plans to make a green jobs announcement at the General Motors' Baltimore plant.

Sen. Catherine Pugh (D-Baltimore City) says she'd like to see table games and slot machines at the parlor planned near M&T Bank Stadium, writes Gary Haber with Baltimore Business Journal.

Repeat drunk or drugged driving offenders could be marked with a boldly colored license plate, writes Greg Latshaw of The (Salisbury) Daily Times. Del. Marvin Holmes Jr., (D-Prince George's County), is sponsoring the bill.

After reaching a compromise reducing the Maryland-mined coal tax credit last year, some legislators may need to fight to keep the reduced tax credit this year, reports Kevin Spradlin in the Comberland Times-News.

New legislation introduced yesterday would put stricter rules on child sex offenders, reports Pat Warren at WJZ.

The man who was to serve as chairman of the Maryland Sexual Offender Advisory Board said his inquiries about the board to meet fell on deaf ears, writes Julie Bykowicz in the Sun blog. The board never met.

In reaction to the Supreme Court decision outlawing limits on corporate spending on political campaigns, Del. Jon Cardin will reintroduce legislation for voluntary public campaign financing in Maryland, according to The Gazette's Doug Tallman.

Montgomery County lawmakers are united in their push to overturn a $46 million penalty for the county's failure to give schools as much as it was supposed to this year, writes Sean Sedam in The Gazette.

Former Gov. Bob Ehrlich was a featured guest at a fundraiser for two delegate candidates in Hagerstown on Monday, but he declined to say if he's running this year, reports Andy Schotz with The Herald-Mail.

RNC Chairman and former Lt. Gov. Michael Steele continues to spend money from his state campaign fund, reports Adam Pagnucco with Maryland Politics Watch.

Rep. Frank Kratovil, the congressman from the Eastern Shore, could have a tough time keeping his seat, writes Paul West with The Sun.

The $1.5 billion Aero Train will make its debut at Dulles today. It was designed to help travelers reach their gates more quickly.

A development company is suing Metro for more that $160 million over a stalled development plan at the Greenbelt Metro station, reports Kytja Weir in the Washington Examiner.

Maryland's Congressional delegation secured $5.6 million in federal funds for roadway improvements, writes Daniel Sernovitz with the Baltimore Business Journal.

The state's Public Service Commission is being urged to approve a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. smart grid program. Scott Dance, in the Baltimore Business Journal, reports the program would give customers more control over their power usage and billing.

With Baltimore City Council President Stephanie Rawlings-Blake soon to become mayor, a majority of council members have declared their support for Councilman Bernard "Jack" Young to fill her seat. However, there is a behind- the-scenes push for Councilman William Cole IV, writes Julie Scharper with The Baltimore Sun.

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