"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, January 26, 2010 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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"Art Beat" With Stephanie Kaye - Tuesday, January 26, 2010

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(Through March 14) MAHALIA There's a revival going on at Alexandria's MetroStage bringing back Mahalia: A Gospel Musical through March 14th. The Helen-Hayes award-winning production follows Mahalia "Halie" Jackson on a wave of song from the shanties of New Orleans to the "magic circle" of Carnegie Hall, in a hilarious and touching hand-clapping show.

(January 27-February 21) PERMANENT COLLECTION Round House Theatre in Bethesda, Maryland opens its newest play, Permanent Collection tomorrow night. The discovery of eight remarkable African sculptures leads to a confrontation about art and race, and the politics at play in a museum's display.

(January 30-March 6) PROJECT 4 Project 4 gallery along D.C.'s U Street Corridor opens the exhibit Underbelly this Saturday and running through March 6th. The artist with a numeral in his name, Adam "5100" Feibelman, hails most recently from San Francisco, bringing images of the Bay City's architecture from a kaleidoscopic point of view.

NPR

Small South Carolina Newspaper Takes Home Top Pulitzer Prize

The winners of this year's Pulitzer Prizes in journalism, fiction, poetry, drama, music, biography, history and nonfiction were announced Monday at Columbia University in New York.
NPR

When Danish Cows See Fresh Spring Pasture, They Jump For Joy

Thousands of spectators gather every April to see ecstatic cows return to fields on organic farms around Denmark. The organic industry says the event has helped fuel demand for organic foods.
WAMU 88.5

Hello, Goodbye: Pair Of Virginia Delegates Depart After Short Careers In Richmond

Some members of the Virginia's General Assembly are throwing in the towel, deciding against seeking reelection. — and some of them haven't been around for very long.
NPR

Solar Power Makes Electricity More Accessible On Navajo Reservation

The panels, funded by government grants, are helping thousands of tribal residents take advantage of the everyday luxuries enjoyed by other Americans — like turning on lights or storing food.

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