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Thousands Push For Presidential D.C. Voting Rights Mention

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By Eric Niiler

Local activists gathered to send petitions to President Obama asking his support for D.C. Voting Rights.

More than 41,000 petitioners asked Mr. Obama to mention D.C. Voting Rights in next week's State of the Union address. D.C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton helped mail the nearly 200 pounds worth of petitions at the National Postal Museum Post Office. Norton said the President supported Voting Rights when he was a Senator, which is reason for him to mention it next week.

"I do not think it is too much to ask for some mention of our rights on the most important platform he could use," says Norton.

Norton believes a push from the President would make a big difference in getting the bill through Congress.

"We know that the ball is in the Congressional court, and not his court," she says. "Call them out."

Norton said that she hopes to bring the bill to the floor soon.

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